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Career

Education
01.02.2018–30.09.2018   
Erasmus Traineeship Centre for Virus Research, MRC-University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
2015–2017   
Master’s Degree: Medical, Veterinary and Forensic Biotechnological Sciences University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
2012–2015   
Bachelor’s Degree: Biotechnology University of Urbino, Fano, Italy
 
 
Additional information
FURTHER EDUCATIONAL COURSES
2016, September – 2017, October
Jean Monnet Course “Research and Innovation Law”, Community research funding. University of Perugia, 2nd semester; Centre of Excellence Jean Monnet "Rights and Science", Roberto Cippitani.
2016, June
Training course for in vivo experimental activities: "Correct Approach to Animal Experimentation", University of Perugia, Director Dr Paolo Mosci, Ce.Se.R.P.;

Qualifications

 
 
Honours & awards
2018, Agnese La Mensa, 2018, February – 2018, September Erasmus Traineeship (8 months) Centre for Virus Research, MRC-University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK Project title: “The activation of the antiviral response in ruminant primary fibroblast and aorta endothelial cells” Supervisors: Prof. Massimo Palmarini, Dr. Meredith Stewart, Dr. Siddharth Bakshi Relevant subjects: Microbiology, Virology, Molecular Biology, Cells Imaging • Hypothesis: the innate immune response may be different depending on host cells and temperature. Primary bovine and ovine fibroblasts were adapted to grow at different temperatures to reflecting those of the core and peripheral regions. Western-immunoblot was used to monitor the induction of the antiviral immune response after PolyI:C transfection. These results demonstrated that the signalling time post induction was delayed. Confocal microscopy was used to validate these findings and showed that the X translocation to the nucleus was not hampered by the different temperature. Schmallenberg virus (SBV) and SBV lacking NSs, a viral interferon antagonist, were used as a model infection of ruminant cells. Virus kinetics were monitored and changes in the signalling of STAT1 phosphorylation were examined. Virus kinetics and the signalling also changed at different temperatures. These preliminary results about temperature influence should be further investigated. • After two months’ training on base techniques, I have independently conducted all the experiments involved. • Techniques acquired o Cell culture: Sterile culturing of ovine and bovine fibroblasts, Vero cells, CPTert, BSR, HEK. o Ability to safely perform virus related work: cell infections (EMCV, SBV), virus growth kinetics experiments, TCID50, plaque assays. o Molecular techniques: preparation of samples for mass spectrometry, western blotting and immunostaining, confocal microscopy and plasmid transfection
 
 
Additional information
2015, October - 2017, October
Master’s Degree: Medical, Veterinary and Forensic Biotechnological Sciences
University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Internship at the Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy (11 months)
“Antibiotic-resistance in Escherichia Coli and Salmonella infantis isolated from broilers: phenotypic and genotypic characterization of ESBL-producing strains” (Score: 110 Cum Laude/110, 1st equivalent)
Supervisor: Prof. Patrizia Casagrande Proietti
Relevant subjects: Microbiology, Molecular Biology

• The antimicrobial resistance in bacteria has become a global problem. Isolates of Salmonella and Escherichia coli recovered from human samples, poultry farm and slaughterhouses samples, collected in different regions of Italy, were analysed for resistance to 17 antimicrobial agents. Salmonella infantis was the serotype found and demonstrated 100% of multidrug resistance profiles. Several E. coli and all the Salmonella infantis isolates were phenotypically ESBL producing strains. In these, some genes that characterize the ESBL production were found by PCR. The genes’ presence was confirmed by WGS. After PFGE analysis, all the Salmonella Infantis isolates presented the same pulsotype. One isolated from human showed similar antibiotic-resistance phenotypes and genotypes profiles to the ESBL isolates from broilers. It illustrates the importance of applying a global One Health human and animal perspective to combat antimicrobial resistance.
• After the initial training, I independently used the following techniques: PCR, Real Time PCR, protein and nucleic acid extraction and purification. Phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance screenings for MDR bacteria, including dilution method, Disk-diffusion method, beta-lactamase detection test.
2012, October – 2015, September
Bachelor’s Degree: Biotechnology
University of Urbino, Fano, Italy
Internship at the Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino, Fano, Italy and CReNaL (Center of National Reference for Leishmaniasis), Experimental Zooprophylactic Institute of Sicily, Palermo, Italy (12 months)
“Diagnosis of quantitative distribution of Leishmania in different tissue districts through Real Time PCR comparison of methodologies as a contribution to the standardization of a real-time PCR method for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis” (Score: 101/110 Second class honours, upper division 2:1)
Supervisors: Prof. Marzia Bianchi, Dott. Fabrizio Vitale
Relevant subjects: Microbiology, Molecular Biology

• Leishmania infantum is one of the causative agents of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). VL is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and can be fatal if it is not properly treated. Although several PCR works are intended to detect L. infantum, in silico analysis of available primers and/or primer-probes reveals potential cross species amplification. In order to determine which diagnosis is more efficient, two methods of Real Time PCR targeting minicircle kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) to detect and quantify Leishmania (infantum) parasites using very different chemicals were compared. The first is an assay based on SYBR Green qPCR, using primers designed in the laboratories of the University of Biotechnology Section of Urbino; the second assay involved the use of a TaqMan probe associated with primers designed at "Istituto Zooprofilattico of Sicily".
• I have been supervised and followed for the whole project, techniques involved: DNA extraction analysis and Real Time PCR
3.03.2020
21.06.1994

Teenistuskäik

Haridustee
01.02.2018–30.09.2018   
Erasmus Traineeship Centre for Virus Research, MRC-University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
2015–2017   
Master’s Degree: Medical, Veterinary and Forensic Biotechnological Sciences University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
2012–2015   
Bachelor’s Degree: Biotechnology University of Urbino, Fano, Italy
 
 
Lisainfo
FURTHER EDUCATIONAL COURSES
2016, September – 2017, October
Jean Monnet Course “Research and Innovation Law”, Community research funding. University of Perugia, 2nd semester; Centre of Excellence Jean Monnet "Rights and Science", Roberto Cippitani.
2016, June
Training course for in vivo experimental activities: "Correct Approach to Animal Experimentation", University of Perugia, Director Dr Paolo Mosci, Ce.Se.R.P.;

Kvalifikatsioon

 
 
Teaduspreemiad ja tunnustused
2018, Agnese La Mensa, 2018, February – 2018, September Erasmus Traineeship (8 months) Centre for Virus Research, MRC-University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK Project title: “The activation of the antiviral response in ruminant primary fibroblast and aorta endothelial cells” Supervisors: Prof. Massimo Palmarini, Dr. Meredith Stewart, Dr. Siddharth Bakshi Relevant subjects: Microbiology, Virology, Molecular Biology, Cells Imaging • Hypothesis: the innate immune response may be different depending on host cells and temperature. Primary bovine and ovine fibroblasts were adapted to grow at different temperatures to reflecting those of the core and peripheral regions. Western-immunoblot was used to monitor the induction of the antiviral immune response after PolyI:C transfection. These results demonstrated that the signalling time post induction was delayed. Confocal microscopy was used to validate these findings and showed that the X translocation to the nucleus was not hampered by the different temperature. Schmallenberg virus (SBV) and SBV lacking NSs, a viral interferon antagonist, were used as a model infection of ruminant cells. Virus kinetics were monitored and changes in the signalling of STAT1 phosphorylation were examined. Virus kinetics and the signalling also changed at different temperatures. These preliminary results about temperature influence should be further investigated. • After two months’ training on base techniques, I have independently conducted all the experiments involved. • Techniques acquired o Cell culture: Sterile culturing of ovine and bovine fibroblasts, Vero cells, CPTert, BSR, HEK. o Ability to safely perform virus related work: cell infections (EMCV, SBV), virus growth kinetics experiments, TCID50, plaque assays. o Molecular techniques: preparation of samples for mass spectrometry, western blotting and immunostaining, confocal microscopy and plasmid transfection
 
 
Lisainfo
2015, October - 2017, October
Master’s Degree: Medical, Veterinary and Forensic Biotechnological Sciences
University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Internship at the Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy (11 months)
“Antibiotic-resistance in Escherichia Coli and Salmonella infantis isolated from broilers: phenotypic and genotypic characterization of ESBL-producing strains” (Score: 110 Cum Laude/110, 1st equivalent)
Supervisor: Prof. Patrizia Casagrande Proietti
Relevant subjects: Microbiology, Molecular Biology

• The antimicrobial resistance in bacteria has become a global problem. Isolates of Salmonella and Escherichia coli recovered from human samples, poultry farm and slaughterhouses samples, collected in different regions of Italy, were analysed for resistance to 17 antimicrobial agents. Salmonella infantis was the serotype found and demonstrated 100% of multidrug resistance profiles. Several E. coli and all the Salmonella infantis isolates were phenotypically ESBL producing strains. In these, some genes that characterize the ESBL production were found by PCR. The genes’ presence was confirmed by WGS. After PFGE analysis, all the Salmonella Infantis isolates presented the same pulsotype. One isolated from human showed similar antibiotic-resistance phenotypes and genotypes profiles to the ESBL isolates from broilers. It illustrates the importance of applying a global One Health human and animal perspective to combat antimicrobial resistance.
• After the initial training, I independently used the following techniques: PCR, Real Time PCR, protein and nucleic acid extraction and purification. Phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance screenings for MDR bacteria, including dilution method, Disk-diffusion method, beta-lactamase detection test.
2012, October – 2015, September
Bachelor’s Degree: Biotechnology
University of Urbino, Fano, Italy
Internship at the Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino, Fano, Italy and CReNaL (Center of National Reference for Leishmaniasis), Experimental Zooprophylactic Institute of Sicily, Palermo, Italy (12 months)
“Diagnosis of quantitative distribution of Leishmania in different tissue districts through Real Time PCR comparison of methodologies as a contribution to the standardization of a real-time PCR method for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis” (Score: 101/110 Second class honours, upper division 2:1)
Supervisors: Prof. Marzia Bianchi, Dott. Fabrizio Vitale
Relevant subjects: Microbiology, Molecular Biology

• Leishmania infantum is one of the causative agents of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). VL is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and can be fatal if it is not properly treated. Although several PCR works are intended to detect L. infantum, in silico analysis of available primers and/or primer-probes reveals potential cross species amplification. In order to determine which diagnosis is more efficient, two methods of Real Time PCR targeting minicircle kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) to detect and quantify Leishmania (infantum) parasites using very different chemicals were compared. The first is an assay based on SYBR Green qPCR, using primers designed in the laboratories of the University of Biotechnology Section of Urbino; the second assay involved the use of a TaqMan probe associated with primers designed at "Istituto Zooprofilattico of Sicily".
• I have been supervised and followed for the whole project, techniques involved: DNA extraction analysis and Real Time PCR
3.03.2020

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ProgramTypeNumberNameProject startProject endPrincipal investigatorInstitutionFinancing
PRGPRG335Elucidating protein synthesis-related processes underlying heterogeneity of bacterial populations during infection01.01.201931.12.2023Tanel TensonUniversity of Tartu, Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Technology457 125,00 EUR