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Olen nõus
"Muu" projekt MLOOM13199
MLOOM13199 "DIVERSE— Mitmekesisus ühiskonna arengu ja majanduselu alus (15.12.2013−14.12.2016)", Tiit Tammaru, Tartu Ülikool, Loodus- ja tehnoloogiateaduskond, Tartu Ülikooli Ökoloogia- ja Maateaduste Instituut, Tartu Ülikool, Loodus- ja täppisteaduste valdkond, ökoloogia ja maateaduste instituut.
MLOOM13199
DIVERSE— Mitmekesisus ühiskonna arengu ja majanduselu alus
DIVERSE— Diversity Improvement as a Viable Enrichment Resource for Society and Economy
DIVERSE— Diversity Improvement as a Viable Enrichment Resource for Society and Economy
15.12.2013
14.12.2016
Teadus- ja arendusprojekt
Muu
ETIS klassifikaatorAlamvaldkondCERCS klassifikaatorFrascati Manual’i klassifikaatorProtsent
2. Ühiskonnateadused ja kultuur2.11. SotsiaalteadusedS230 Sotsiaalne geograafia5.4. Teised sotsiaalteadused (sotsiaal- ja kultuurantropoloogia, etnoloogia, demograafia, inim-, majandus- ja sotsiaalgeograafia, munitsipaal- ja regionaalplaneering, haldusjuhtimine, õigusteadus, lingvistika, politoloogia, sotsioloogia jne.100,0
AsutusRiikTüüp
Euroopa Komisjon
PerioodSumma
15.12.2013−14.12.201637 383,66 EUR
37 383,66 EUR

In most EU countries, a large part of Third Country Nationals (TCNs) experience a situation of sufferance linked to both specific risks in the employment domain and conditions of social exclusion. This is related to two primary features we find in the European model of integration: first, an over-emphasis on the economic and working dimension, conceived as the key one justifying TCN workers’ presence in the host countries; secondly, a tendency to collectively represent TCNs’ work and economic role in terms of an asymmetric complementarity with autochthonous labor, a perception which is fuelled by – and simultaneously favors – immigrant concentrations in specific, mainly low qualified, job sectors (where job vacancies are mostly concentrated). At the same time, however, the consolidation of the migratory phenomenon has led EU countries, according to their distinctive tradition of respect for individual dignity, to extend rights and protection for TCNs and their family members, fostering the spreading of the condition of “denizen”. As a result, at the heart of the European model of integration there is an implicit tension between the economicism implied by EU members states’ systems of entry regulation and the principles of solidarity and equal opportunities. In order to sustain both economic competitiveness and social cohesion in Europe, the project aims to tackle three major challenges as related to TCNs. The first change entails the progressive evolution of a system based on the depiction of immigrants as “contingently instrumental resources”, in order to render TCNs’ abilities and potential a structural resource for the qualitative development of EU economies and societies, according to a real “human capital model”. The second change entails a more diffuse and more conscious adoption, among different kinds of organization (private, public and non-profit), of diversity management (DM); i.e., an approach to human capital capable not only of favoring the expression of those traits (attitudes, skills, needs, etc.) that are specific to certain groups of people, but also of transforming such factors into an added value for the organizational performance. The third essential change deals with the necessity of rebalancing an integration model that so far has largely stressed the economic (and working) dimension at the expense of the social and political ones.
In most EU countries, a large part of Third Country Nationals (TCNs) experience a situation of sufferance linked to both specific risks in the employment domain and conditions of social exclusion. This is related to two primary features we find in the European model of integration: first, an over-emphasis on the economic and working dimension, conceived as the key one justifying TCN workers’ presence in the host countries; secondly, a tendency to collectively represent TCNs’ work and economic role in terms of an asymmetric complementarity with autochthonous labor, a perception which is fuelled by – and simultaneously favors – immigrant concentrations in specific, mainly low qualified, job sectors (where job vacancies are mostly concentrated). At the same time, however, the consolidation of the migratory phenomenon has led EU countries, according to their distinctive tradition of respect for individual dignity, to extend rights and protection for TCNs and their family members, fostering the spreading of the condition of “denizen”. As a result, at the heart of the European model of integration there is an implicit tension between the economicism implied by EU members states’ systems of entry regulation and the principles of solidarity and equal opportunities. In order to sustain both economic competitiveness and social cohesion in Europe, the project aims to tackle three major challenges as related to TCNs. The first change entails the progressive evolution of a system based on the depiction of immigrants as “contingently instrumental resources”, in order to render TCNs’ abilities and potential a structural resource for the qualitative development of EU economies and societies, according to a real “human capital model”. The second change entails a more diffuse and more conscious adoption, among different kinds of organization (private, public and non-profit), of diversity management (DM); i.e., an approach to human capital capable not only of favoring the expression of those traits (attitudes, skills, needs, etc.) that are specific to certain groups of people, but also of transforming such factors into an added value for the organizational performance. The third essential change deals with the necessity of rebalancing an integration model that so far has largely stressed the economic (and working) dimension at the expense of the social and political ones.
KirjeldusProtsent
Rakendusuuring100,0