"Muu" projekt MLOTI11126R
MLOTI11126R "RADINTERFACES - Kristalsete materjalide pinnal toimuvat kontrollitud radiatsiooni defektide uurimine erinevate arvutisimulatsioonide abil (1.09.2011−31.08.2014)", Alvo Aabloo, Tartu Ülikool, Tartu Ülikool, Loodus- ja tehnoloogiateaduskond, Tartu Ülikooli Tehnoloogiainstituut.
MLOTI11126R
RADINTERFACES - Kristalsete materjalide pinnal toimuvat kontrollitud radiatsiooni defektide uurimine erinevate arvutisimulatsioonide abil
RADINTERFACES - Multiscale Modelling and Materials by Design of interface-controlled Radiation Damage in Crystalline Materials
RADINTERFACES - Multiscale Modelling and Materials by Design of interface-controlled Radiation Damage in Crystalline Materials
1.09.2011
31.08.2014
Teadus- ja arendusprojekt
Muu
ETIS klassifikaatorAlamvaldkondCERCS klassifikaatorFrascati Manual’i klassifikaatorProtsent
4. Loodusteadused ja tehnika4.12. Protsessitehnoloogia ja materjaliteadusT150 Materjalitehnoloogia2.3. Teised tehnika- ja inseneriteadused (keemiatehnika, lennundustehnika, mehaanika, metallurgia, materjaliteadus ning teised seotud erialad: puidutehnoloogia, geodeesia, tööstuskeemia, toiduainete tehnoloogia, süsteemianalüüs, metallurgia, mäendus, tekstiilitehnoloogia ja teised seotud teadused).100,0
AsutusRiikTüüp
Euroopa Komisjon
PerioodSumma
01.09.2011−31.08.2014321 134,00 EUR
321 134,00 EUR
7.raamprogramm

Radiation damage is known to lead to materials failure and thus is of critical importance to lifetime and safety within nuclear reactors. While materials mechanical behavior under irradiation has been subject to numerous studies, the current predictive capabilities appear limited. Observations and physical models have shown that the most important damage contributions arise from point defect localization –leading to void swelling- and creep. It was recently found that void swelling can be prevented via use of non coherent heterophase interfaces. It is very likely that other interface types may exhibit similar trends. Unfortunately, no tool is available to generally predict the effect of interface composition (monophase, heterophase) and structure (geometry, roughness) on its propensity to resist radiation damage (both via defect localization and creep). These limitations motivate the proposed study which aims at developing such tool. Given the multi-scale multi physics nature of the problem, the consortium is formed by experts in the fields of materials modeling via ab initio, molecular dynamics and continuum modeling as well as of materials characterization and processing via mechanical alloying and physical vapor deposition. The program aims at constructing a bottom-up framework allowing discovery and quantifications of materials damage mechanisms and effects on mechanical properties for novel crystalline materials with large interfacial areas. Model validation will arise through direct comparison with materials testing for a wide array of materials systems (metal/metal, metal/oxide, oxide/oxyde).
Radiation damage is known to lead to materials failure and thus is of critical importance to lifetime and safety within nuclear reactors. While materials mechanical behavior under irradiation has been subject to numerous studies, the current predictive capabilities appear limited. Observations and physical models have shown that the most important damage contributions arise from point defect localization –leading to void swelling- and creep. It was recently found that void swelling can be prevented via use of non coherent heterophase interfaces. It is very likely that other interface types may exhibit similar trends. Unfortunately, no tool is available to generally predict the effect of interface composition (monophase, heterophase) and structure (geometry, roughness) on its propensity to resist radiation damage (both via defect localization and creep). These limitations motivate the proposed study which aims at developing such tool. Given the multi-scale multi physics nature of the problem, the consortium is formed by experts in the fields of materials modeling via ab initio, molecular dynamics and continuum modeling as well as of materials characterization and processing via mechanical alloying and physical vapor deposition. The program aims at constructing a bottom-up framework allowing discovery and quantifications of materials damage mechanisms and effects on mechanical properties for novel crystalline materials with large interfacial areas. Model validation will arise through direct comparison with materials testing for a wide array of materials systems (metal/metal, metal/oxide, oxide/oxyde).
KirjeldusProtsent
Alusuuring100,0