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"Horisont 2020 programm" projekt MLTOM18431R
MLTOM18431R (813114) "A glimpse into the Arctic future: equipping a unique natural experiment for next-generation ecosystem research (1.06.2019−31.05.2023)", Ivika Ostonen-Märtin, Tartu Ülikool, Loodus- ja täppisteaduste valdkond, ökoloogia ja maateaduste instituut.
813114
MLTOM18431R
A glimpse into the Arctic future: equipping a unique natural experiment for next-generation ecosystem research
A glimpse into the Arctic future: equipping a unique natural experiment for next-generation ecosystem research
FutureArctic
1.06.2019
31.05.2023
Teadus- ja arendusprojekt
Horisont 2020 programm
ETIS klassifikaatorAlamvaldkondCERCS klassifikaatorFrascati Manual’i klassifikaatorProtsent
1. Bio- ja keskkonnateadused1.4. Ökoloogia, biosüstemaatika ja -füsioloogiaB270 Taimeökoloogia 1.6 Bioteadused70,0
1. Bio- ja keskkonnateadused1.2. MikrobioloogiaB230 Mikrobioloogia, bakterioloogia, viroloogia, mükoloogia 1.6 Bioteadused30,0
AsutusRiikTüüp
Euroopa Komisjon
PerioodSumma
01.06.2019−31.05.2023232 069,68 EUR
232 069,68 EUR

Climate change will affect Arctic ecosystems more than any other ecosystem worldwide, with temperature increases expected up to 4-6°C. While this is threatening the integrity and biodiversity of the ecosystems in itself, the larger ecosystem feedbacks triggered by this change are even more worrisome. During millions of years, atmospheric carbon has been stored in the Arctic soils. With warming, the carbon can rapidly escape the soils in the form of CO2 and (even worse) the strong greenhouse agent CH4. Despite decades of research, scientists still struggle to unveil the scale of this carbon exchange, and especially how it will interact with climate change. An overarching question remains: how much carbon will potentially escape the Arctic in the future climate, and how will this affect climate change? FutureArctic embeds this research challenge directly in an inter-sectoral training initiative for early stage researchers, that aims to form “ecosystem-of-things” scientists and engineers at the ForHot site. The FORHOT site in Iceland offers a geothermally controlled soil temperature warming gradient, to study how Arctic ecosystem processes are affected by temperature increases as expected through climate change. FutureArctic aims to pave the way for generalized permanently connected data acquisition systems for key environmental variables and processes. We will initiate a new machine-learning approach to analyse large high-throughput environmental data-streams, through installing a pioneer "ecosystem-of-things" at the ForHot site. FutureArctic will thus channel, building on a timely project in the ForHot area, an important evolution to machine-assisted environmental fundamental research. This is achieved through the dedicated training of researchers with profiles at the intersectoral edge of computer science, artificial intelligence, environmental science (both experimental and modelling), social sciences and sensor engineering and communication.
Climate change will affect Arctic ecosystems more than any other ecosystem worldwide, with temperature increases expected up to 4-6°C. While this is threatening the integrity and biodiversity of the ecosystems in itself, the larger ecosystem feedbacks triggered by this change are even more worrisome. During millions of years, atmospheric carbon has been stored in the Arctic soils. With warming, the carbon can rapidly escape the soils in the form of CO2 and (even worse) the strong greenhouse agent CH4. Despite decades of research, scientists still struggle to unveil the scale of this carbon exchange, and especially how it will interact with climate change. An overarching question remains: how much carbon will potentially escape the Arctic in the future climate, and how will this affect climate change? FutureArctic embeds this research challenge directly in an inter-sectoral training initiative for early stage researchers, that aims to form “ecosystem-of-things” scientists and engineers at the ForHot site. The FORHOT site in Iceland offers a geothermally controlled soil temperature warming gradient, to study how Arctic ecosystem processes are affected by temperature increases as expected through climate change. FutureArctic aims to pave the way for generalized permanently connected data acquisition systems for key environmental variables and processes. We will initiate a new machine-learning approach to analyse large high-throughput environmental data-streams, through installing a pioneer "ecosystem-of-things" at the ForHot site. FutureArctic will thus channel, building on a timely project in the ForHot area, an important evolution to machine-assisted environmental fundamental research. This is achieved through the dedicated training of researchers with profiles at the intersectoral edge of computer science, artificial intelligence, environmental science (both experimental and modelling), social sciences and sensor engineering and communication.
KirjeldusProtsent
Alusuuring50,0
Rakendusuuring50,0
AsutusRollRiikTüüpKommentaar
CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION ECOLOGICA YAPpartnerHispaania KuningriikTA asutus
Dansk Miljørådgivning A/SpartnerTaani Kuningriikettevõte
EIGEN VERMOGEN VAN HET INSTITUUT VOOR LANDBOUW EN VISSERIJONDERZOEKpartnerBelgia KuningriikTA asutus
INTERUNIVERSITAIR MICRO-ELECTRONICA CENTRUMpartnerBelgia Kuningriikettevõte
KOBENHAVNS UNIVERSITETpartnerTaani Kuningriikülikool
LANDBUNADARHASKOLI ISLANDSpartnerIslandi Vabariikülikool
MICROSOFT NVpartnerBelgia Kuningriikettevõte
MIRICO LTDpartnerSuurbritannia ja Põhja-Iiri Ühendkuningriikettevõte
PRENART EQUIPMENT ApSpartnerTaani Kuningriikettevõte
Svarmi ehf.partnerIslandi Vabariikettevõte
UNIVERSITAET INNSBRUCKpartnerAustria Vabariikülikool
UNIVERSITAT WIENpartnerAustria Vabariikülikool
UNIVERSITEIT ANTWERPENkoordinaatorBelgia Kuningriikülikool
Vienna Scientific Instruments GmbHpartnerAustria Vabariikettevõte