"Personaalne uurimistoetus" projekt PUT30
PUT30 "Life in the Sacrifice Zone: Biopower, Territoriality and Ruination (1.01.2013−31.12.2016)", Hugo Reinert, Tallinna Ülikool, Humanitaarteaduste instituut.
PUT30
Life in the Sacrifice Zone: Biopower, Territoriality and Ruination
Life in the Sacrifice Zone: Biopower, Territoriality and Ruination
1.01.2013
31.12.2016
Teadus- ja arendusprojekt
Personaalne uurimistoetus
Stardiprojekt
ValdkondAlamvaldkondCERCS erialaFrascati Manual’i erialaProtsent
2. Ühiskonnateadused ja kultuur2.11. SotsiaalteadusedS230 Sotsiaalne geograafia5.4. Teised sotsiaalteadused (sotsiaal- ja kultuurantropoloogia, etnoloogia, demograafia, inim-, majandus- ja sotsiaalgeograafia, munitsipaal- ja regionaalplaneering, haldusjuhtimine, õigusteadus, lingvistika, politoloogia, sotsioloogia jne.70,0
2. Ühiskonnateadused ja kultuur2.4. KultuuriuuringudS220 Kultuuriantropoloogia, etnoloogia 6.3. Muud humanitaarteadused (filosoofia - s.h. teaduse ja tehnika filosoofia, kunstiteadused, kunstiajalugu, kunstikriitika, maalikunst, skulptuur, muusikateadus, teatriteadus, religioon, teoloogia jne.)30,0
AsutusRollPeriood
Tallinna Ülikool, Humanitaarteaduste instituutkoordinaator01.01.2013−31.12.2016
PerioodSumma
01.01.2013−31.12.201340 800,00 EUR
01.01.2014−31.12.201440 800,00 EUR
01.01.2015−31.12.201540 800,00 EUR
01.01.2016−31.12.201640 800,00 EUR
163 200,00 EUR

At the interface between anthropology, human geography and the environmental humanities, the proposed project explores the analytical potential of “sacrifice zones” as a concept that illuminates the social, territorial and biopolitical dimensions of spatial planning and resource management in Norway and Estonia. Using qualitative ethnographic methods to investigate the emergence of such zones along the Arctic resource frontier and in Estonia – exploring issues of representation, environmental justice and political power – the project develops and refines a productive comparative theoretical framework for the future analysis of strategically important domains, including mineral wealth extraction, urban planning, energy infrastructure development and biodiversity conservation.
At the interface between anthropology, human geography and the environmental humanities, the proposed project explores the analytical potential of “sacrifice zones” as a concept that illuminates the social, territorial and biopolitical dimensions of spatial planning and resource management in Norway and Estonia. Using qualitative ethnographic methods to investigate the emergence of such zones along the Arctic resource frontier and in Estonia – exploring issues of representation, environmental justice and political power – the project develops and refines a productive comparative theoretical framework for the future analysis of strategically important domains, including mineral wealth extraction, urban planning, energy infrastructure development and biodiversity conservation.