Enactive cinema paves way for understanding complex real-time social interaction in neuroimaging experiments

Tikka, P.; Väljamäe, A.; de Borst, A.W.; Pugliese, R.; Ravaja, N.; Kaipainen, M.; Takala, T. (2012). Enactive cinema paves way for understanding complex real-time social interaction in neuroimaging experiments. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, NOVEMBER 2012, 1.10.3389/fnhum.2012.00298.
ajakirjaartikkel
Tikka, P.; Väljamäe, A.; de Borst, A.W.; Pugliese, R.; Ravaja, N.; Kaipainen, M.; Takala, T.
  • Inglise
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
1662-5161
NOVEMBER 2012
2012
1
Ilmunud
1.1. Teadusartiklid, mis on kajastatud Web of Science andmebaasides Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, Arts & Humanities Citation Index ja/või andmebaasis Scopus (v.a. kogumikud)
SCOPUS

Viited terviktekstile

dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2012.00298

Seotud asutused

Aalto University; Karl-Franzens-Universitat Graz; NeuroGenetics Media Lab; Aalto University; Helsingin Yliopisto; Aalto University; Sodertorn University

Lisainfo

We outline general theoretical and practical implications of what we promote as enactive cinema for the neuroscientific study of online socio-emotional interaction. In a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) setting, participants are immersed in cinematic experiences that simulate social situations. While viewing, their physiological reactions-including brain responses-are tracked, representing implicit and unconscious experiences of the on-going social situations. These reactions, in turn, are analyzed in real-time and fed back to modify the cinematic sequences they are viewing while being scanned. Due to the engaging cinematic content, the proposed setting focuses on living-by in terms of shared psycho-physiological epiphenomena of experience rather than active coping in terms of goal-oriented motor actions. It constitutes a means to parametrically modify stimuli that depict social situations and their broader environmental contexts. As an alternative to studying the variation of brain responses as a function of a priori fixed stimuli, this method can be applied to survey the range of stimuli that evoke similar responses across participants at particular brain regions of interest. © 2012 Tikka,Väljamäe,de Borst,Pugliese,Ravaja,Kaipainenand Takala.
Brain computer interfaces | Enactive cinema | Generative storytelling | Implicit interaction | Neurofeedback | Real-time fmri | Social neuroscience